• scene
  • scene
  • scene
  • scene
  • scene
  • scene

Plenary Speakers

 

Robin Braun, University of Technology Sydney, Australia

Title:

Can we use new ways of modelling complex systems to optimise student learning

Abstract

Students and the way they learn, combined with the learning programs and environments we provide for them are complex and intractable systems. They create the wonderful emergent properties of learning, capability and creativity. The fundamental question is this. Can we model the process using new agent based modelling paradigms so as to both predict and optimise these emergent properties? This talk will explore both the learning system, and the modelling paradigm, using NetLogo to see if the two can ever meet, and if this may be useful to us.

 Bio/Photo

Robin Braun received the B.Sc.(Hons) from Brighton University in the UK, and the M.Sc.(Eng) and PhD from the University of Cape Town, South Africa in 1980, 1982 and 1986 respectively. Professor Braun started his academic career in 1986 at the University of Cape Town, where he was director of the Digital Communications Research Group. He moved to the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia, in 1998, where he occupies the Chair of Telecommunications Engineering. Prior to moving to academia, he spent 10 years in industry, mostly with Philips and Plessey, where he worked on the design of precision electronic distance measuring equipment. His recent work has been in network protocols and Software Defined Networks. He has a strong interest in radar and remote sensing. Dr Braun has been active in the IEEE and URSI for many years, serving as URSI Commission C representative, as well as chairing and being on the technical committees of a number of international Conference or TPC chair, including ITHET since 2006. Professor Braun’s primary interests are in communications networks and sensor networks. He is interested in their theoretical constructs, middleware for their resources, routing algorithms and embedding such networks in feedback control systems. He has a deep interest in Complex Systems and their modelling. Professor Braun is a committed academic with a deep interest in new teaching paradigms and his current major work at UTS is the introduction of an engineering degree majoring in Data Engineering.  

 

 

Rob REILLY, IEEE Education and Computer Societies

Title:

You can receive the Nobel Prize!

Abstract

 

 Bio/Photo

Rob Reilly received his B. S. degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; a Master of Education degree from Springfield College, Springfield and a Doctor of Education Degree from University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He has just completed a 2-year term on the IEEE Board of Directors. He has served as the president of the IEEE Education Society (2011-2012), he continues to be the Vice Chair, Member and in the Geographic Activity Board of the IEEE Computer Society. Dr. Reilly has served in a number of other IEEE positions. He has received several awards including IGIP’s Nikola Tesla Chain, the IEEE Computer Society’s Golden Core Award, the IEEE William E. Sayle II Award for Achievement in Education (given by the IEEE Education Society in 2010) and the IEEE Leadership Award (by the IEEE Member and Geographic Activity Board in 2009). While at the MIT Media Lab, his research focus was educational pedagogy – how a person learns – how can an educator facilitate a person’s learning journey in any knowledge domain.

 

 

SirinTekinay, Isik Univ. TR

Title:

If all the books in all the libraries talk to one another: what technology can do for education.

Abstract

The grand challenges facing not only human life but the whole of planet Earth are mostly imminent threats. The human race has to evolve fast into “Homo Symbius” in order to survive; in order to solve these grand challenges. The good news is, Homo Symbius, the communicative cooperationist, can be raised through multi-disciplinary education, in a collaborative, inspiring environment. Disciplinary boundaries have to be broken without sacrificing depth of expertise in one area, by cross-fertilization of innovation and design efforts to produce end-to-end solutions. The technology that would enable us to speak into thin air and “call” the information or product we need in halogram form or out of a nearby 3D printer exists today- the obstacle is the mindset that divides information into disciplines, and assigns production away from consumers. Thanks to Open Access, the Internet, new rules and regulations governing intellectual property; education materials, data, science, and designs are all at the command of the T-shaped graduate who will be an in-depth (vertical) expert in their respective area and a teamplayer with others, effectively (horizontally) interacting with others.

 Bio/Photo

Professor Sirin Tekinay is the Rector and Professor of Electrical and Electronics Engineering at Işık University. After a twenty-year career in the USA, she returned to her home country to serve as the first Vice Rector for Research and Technology. She has also served as the Dean of Engineering and Natural Sciences. Before her return to Turkey, she was tenured faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology. From 2005-2009, she served the United States National Science Foundation as Program Director of Communications and three other multi-disciplinary and inter-agency programs, in addition to founding and chairing a new, 750 M USD program called "Cyber Enabled Discovery and Innovation." Dr. Tekinay holds the PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from George Mason University, Virginia, and the MS and BS degrees in Electrical-Electronics Engineering from Bogazici University, Istanbul.

Prof. Tekinay holds nine patents and has authored numerous publications in her field. She has graduated six doctoral students. Her areas of interest include network science, mobile networks, sensor networks, and applications. She founded the first digital local fabrication laboratory in Turkey; "FabLab Istanbul." She also started the first comprehensive program in Urban Engineering research and education.

She is one of the pioneers of the five-dimensional STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) approach to education and research, in addition to new multidisciplinary lines of study, innovation and entrepreneurship, and the Maker Movement through FabLabs.

She is a member of European Engineering Deans Council – EEDC. She is a consultant and expert reviewer for the European Commission (EC) on Science and Technology. She sits as elected member on the Board of Directors of the European Society for Engineering Education (Societe Europeenne pour la Formation des Ingenieurs  – SEFI) and on the Executive Committee of the Global Engineering Deans Council – GEDC.

RSAM2015
July 10-12, 2017
16th International Conference on
Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training
Ohrid, Macedonia
IEEE IEEE
IEEE IEEE IEEE